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Elizabeth Kortright Monroe

Elizabeht was born June 30, 1768 in New York City.

Her father was an officer in the British Army and a merchant. He lost most of his fortune in the Revolutionary War.

She married James Monroe in February of 1786. She was seventeen.

They had three children. They had two girls and a boy who died as a baby.

It is said that her happiest days were the ones she and James spent in France while he was the Minister to France from the United States.

She is credited with saving the life of Madame deLafayette. On the day Madame deLafayette was scheduled to die, Elizabeth went to visit her in her prison cell. The French realized the Americans did not want deLafayette, whose husband helped in the American Revolution, to die. The French released her.

In 1817, she and James moved into the White House.

She and James held weekly teas at the White House.

Mrs. Monroe was ill much of the time while James Monroe was President.

She died on September 23, 1830.

 
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First Ladies Home

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Sources of Information:

Books:
Barden, Cindy,Meet the First Ladies, Lorenz Corp.
Gormley, Beatrice,First Ladies: Women Who Called The White House Home (First Ladies) , Scholastic Paperbacks, 1997
Smith, Carter, Editor,Smithsonian Presidents and First Ladies DK Publishing, New York, 2002

Web Sites:
The White House: http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/firstladies/
Portraits of the Presidents and First Ladies: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/odmdhtml/